Achieving the Best Possible Outcomes in Legal Cases

  • Divorce On A Tight-Budget: Three Ideas

    1 June 2016

    Perhaps the best example of how expensive divorce can be is seen when a celebrity or any other high-profile personality chooses to go separate ways with their spouse. Despite the fact that divorce-related expenses will not be as high for the average Australian, the cost of divorce can still be prohibitive for a large number of people. This article discusses three ideas that a prospective divorcee can implement in their bid to bring down the cost of being "

  • Conveyancing FAQs: The Solicitor's Quote

    31 May 2016

    The law does not make it mandatory for a prospective property investor to hire the services of a conveyancing solicitor. However, a large number of prospective first-time homeowners find DIY conveyancing to be cumbersome. Homeowners are often advised to get and compare a number of quotes from different conveyancing solicitors as they strive to make their pick. With this in mind, this article provides answers to three questions that a prospective first-time homeowner may have in relation to the conveyancing solicitor's quote.

  • What Not to Say to an Insurance Agent Following an Accident

    27 May 2016

    Your insurance agent might be your personal friend and probably you even socialize with him or her on occasion. However, no matter how sociable or friendly your agent is, the insurance firm he or she works for can be your worst adversary following a motor vehicle accident. Shortly after the mishap and after filing the claim with your insurance firm, the insurance guys will request to speak to you regarding the motor vehicle accident and getting to know what actually happened.

  • Contesting A Will On Grounds Of Mental Capacity

    27 May 2016

    There are a number of grounds on which the validity of a will may be contested, one of which is mental capacity.  But what defines mental capacity, and how do you go about challenging a will on these grounds?  Read on for a basic overview. What defines mental capacity? For a will to be valid, the testator (the person who made the will) must have been of "sound mind, memory and understanding"